Do you aspire to one day be on the cover of Time magazine? Do you want to make a contribution to society and leave a lasting impact? We know you said yes! And we are going to tell you how to do it –through making an innovation in science and technology! And yes, you can do it! And, if you doubt that – Powers Education will make you believe it and is here to help you make this leap.  First, let us inspire you to by telling about Professor Frances Arnold, who is the first woman to win the 2016 Millennium Technology Prize, only awarded every two years.

Dr. Arnold was granted the prize for her work in sustainable technological innovation, which has real life applications.

She developed a way to remove harmful heavy metal catalysts from a common drug manufacturing process, which caused environmental damage and raise health concerns. For example, Januvia, a very common type 2 diabetes drug, is manufactured using heavy metals in a process that creates toxic waste. However, Arnold's method is being used to produce an enzyme which can replace the chemical process that requires the metals,thus creating a much more sustainable and environmentally friendly to way to manufacture this important medication 

Dr. Arnold winning this prestigious award is significant because it recognizes her achievement as a scientist and also highlights her position as a female role model in the industry, as she is the first woman to receive the award. Through tutoring and mentoring from accomplished women, you can aspire to be like Dr. Arnold, get closer to the A you want in class, and closer to a rewarding career path one in which you can succeed and add tremendous value. We know what it takes to be successful in science and our goal is to encourage every young woman to see the potential within her and to realize it. Women like Professor Arnold inspire Powers Education and this is the kind of success that PowersEducation aids young women in striving for. 

Image Source: By Beavercheme (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons